Monthly Archives: August 2015

Somewhere in Mexico: The Talking Cross

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Felipe Carillo Puerto, MexicoI had to keep reminding myself we were in search of a “Talking Cross” and not a “Singing Cross.”  As much as I wanted to be in a Disney movie, the legend only accounted for a cross that had talked (although, seriously, I think the big bucks would have been to go with a cross that could belt one out).  Anyway, as the legend goes…

in 1849, when the War of the Castes turned against them, the Maya of the northern Yucatan Peninsula made their way to Carrillo Puerto seeking refuge.  Regrouping, they were ready to sally forth again in 1850 when a ‘miracle’ occurred.  A wooden cross erected at a cenote on the western edge of the town began to talk – exhorting the Maya to continue the struggle against the Spanish and promising victory (bold cross or ventriloquist?). The oracle guided the Maya in battle for more than eight years, until their great victory, conquering the fortress at Bacalar.  Carrillo Puerto today remains a center of Maya pride – as a symbol of the Maya people’s struggle against inequality and injustice.*

On this particular day of driving from Bacalar to Playa Del Carmen in the state of Quintana Roo in Mexico, we found ourselves in the vicinity of the town of Felipe Carrillo Puerto.  It was decided we could not move forward until we had found and seen this talking cross (secretly, I was still hoping for a Let It Go reprise).

We, duh, went to the main church square in town – seemed like the logical place to find a revered cross.

Felipe Carrillo Puerto, Mexico

I don’t see any inanimate objects here that look loquacious…?

But no luck.  Further inquiries with the very kind overseer at the old church led us next to a location a few blocks away – down a deserted road on the edge of town…

Felipe Carrillo Puerto, Mexico

…where we found the talking cross housed in an old thatch roofed building, with some – while not so illustrious – but very attentive caretakers:

Felipe Carrillo Puerto, Mexico - The Talking Cross

No shoes allowed, no shirts required.

No shoes were allowed worn inside the premises, and apparently one of the caretakers felt this translated to shirts as well.  Anyway, at long last, we were finally able to view the Talking Cross.

The talking cross - Mexico

Teen is enthralled…with the thought of getting an actual coke soon. 

It’s back there behind all the garlands, liter coke bottles filled with water and other various offerings – the reason for which our guide was not really able to explain to us (the cross might get thirsty if it decides to talk again…?)

It did not talk for us (nor did it sing) – but I thought I might have heard a few bars being hummed as we left the premises…or, that might have been Teen doing his best ventriloquist imitation.

For more travels in Mexico:

Somewhere in Mexico: Roberto Barrios Falls

Somewhere in Mexico: Beautiful Bacalar

Thanks for the Memories, Mexico

 

For more SWEET SPOT TRAVELS: Go Here

*Mexico Lonely Planet

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Somewhere in Mexico: Roberto Barrios Falls

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Roberto Barrios Falls, MexicoWe briefly wondered if we had made a mistake as we watched the large tour bus, bound for Agua Azul, pull out of our hotel parking lot in Palenque, Mexico.  We, my husband, two teenage sons and I,  had decided instead to go on a quest in search of a different set of waterfalls that day – Roberto Barrios Falls in the small town of (you guessed it) Roberto Barrios.  We were excited about the prospect even though the town of Roberto Barrios was not on any map we could find,  the Cascades de Roberto Barrios were not listed in any guide books or brochures, and other than some random blog posts and a few references on Trip Advisor, the falls seemed to be a bit of a hidden secret (which meant we absolutely had to find them!).

Here is what we did know:

  1.  If we drove 7 km on the road towards Agua Azul there would be a right turn onto a “paved road” and 14 km later we should arrive  in the town of Roberto Barrios.

2.  Once in the town, we needed to find the “central park”.  The central park turned out to be more of a large grassy area with a neat old church.

Photo Aug 04, 6 05 58 PM

3.  We would know we were in the right spot when local children approached us to be our guide to the waterfalls for 20 pesos (about $1.25) per person.

With that limited amount of information, we actually made it to our destination!

Since there was no actual indication of where the falls were, we decided to take up the offer of a guide. Our guide was a teenage boy named Rafael.  He spoke only Spanish.  As we walked down the dirt path into the jungle he explained that the people of the town owned and operated the falls together.  Tourists had only started coming there in the last 4 years but (unfortunately in a way) interest seemed to be growing.

After a relatively short walk down a jungle path,

Roberto Barrios Falls, Mexico

we came upon the first of the several waterfalls and it took our breath away!

Roberto Barrios Falls, Mexico

At Rafael’s suggestion, we continued on the path to the lowest of multiple falls and began our exploration there.

Roberto Barrios Falls, Mexico

We moved up the falls both by walking the path or (in the teens case) climbing up through the rocks and falls to get to the next level up – Going behind waterfalls into small caves to see bats and swimming in the bigger pools.

Roberto Barrios Falls, Mexico

At  one of the upper level pools, there were some natural diving boards to jump off of.

Roberto Barrios Falls, Mexico

At every turn there was another beautiful vista.

Roberto Barrios Falls, Mexico

All of water was a clear sea green, warmed by the sun.

Roberto Barrios Falls, Mexico

We were loath to leave, but as we made the walk back we purchased from local merchants some sliced mango (the most amazing ever,  according to Teen).

Roberto Barrios Falls, Mexico

… fresh off the tree coconut water.

Roberto Barrios Falls, Mexico

 

And homemade fried plantains.

Side note: Afraid to eat homemade food in Mexico? GOOD – that means more for me.  The best food I have  had in Mexico has been at the hands of locals, cooking right on the street or out of their own kitchens and no “Montezuma’s revenge.”

Teen says, in actuality,  bad WiFi in Mexico is Montezuma’s true revenge.

As we were leaving, the local boys were reclaiming their watering hole.  I hope it stays that way.

Roberto Barrios Falls, MexicoFor more Sweet Spot Travels: GO HERE

For more on Mexico:

Somewhere in Mexico: The Talking Cross

Somewhere in Mexico: Beautiful Bacalar

Thanks for the Memories, Mexicog